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Milo Vanek

Milo Vanek was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He served in the Army in Hawaii at Schofield Barracks. After the war, he was a member of the Territorial War Memorial Commission.

 

Vanek Milo

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Preparedness and Navy Support During the War

When the U.S. broke off diplomatic relations with Germany, The Hawaii Chapter of the Women’s Section of the Navy League was organized in Honolulu in 1915 and 1916 with a membership of more than one thousand, from all parts of the territory, as part of the preparedness movement which spread over the country in those years.

In the beginning of February 1917, the preparedness movement swept across the nation, the Hawaii Chapter of the Navy League held a meeting in the old Opera House in Honolulu (later the location of the Federal Post Office) to discuss preparedness plans, navy support, and the part that patriotic women could play in the war.

Mrs. Gerrit P. Wilder organized about a dozen classes in Red Cross first aid, hygiene and taking care of the sick in a home setting.  Colonel R. G. Ebert, U. S. A., and Drs. E. D. Kilbourne, Charles Adams, W. C. Hobdy, Grover Batten, and J. R. Judd, taught the classes on a volunteer basis.  Mrs. F.F. Killion and Miss Janet Dewar taught the classes on hygiene and care taking  Dr. Charles Adams also taught an advanced first aid class to women who had received certificates at a Red Cross class early in 1915.

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People Who Served on the War Memorial Committee

Editors Note:

One of the greatest pieces of folklore in Hawaii today involves how the people of Hawaii came up for the concept to honor the men and women of Hawaii. One theory by a person who served on the Kapiolani Park Preservation Society at one point, claims the pool theme of the memorial was really a tribute to Duke Kahanamoku. We have found nothing to support this. What we can share with you is the list of people who contributed to the concept, design and building of the memorial. 

 

  1. Colonel Howard Hathaway
  2. Ned Loomis
  3. W.D. Westervelt
  4. Fred W. Beckley
  5. Princess Kalanianaole
  6. Mrs. Walter Macfarlane
  7. Mrs. A.A. Young
  8. Mrs. J.M. Dowsett
  9. C.R. Hemenway
  10. Senator John H. Wise
  11. J.D. McInerny
  12. Senator M.C. Pacheco introduced bill for the construction of a memorial building

War Memorial Committee

  1. Senator John H. Wise
  2. Mrs. A.A. Young
  3. J.D. McInerny
  4. Mrs. J.M. Dowsett
  5. C.R. Hemenway
  6. Mrs. Walter Macfarlane


Waikiki Memorial Subcommittee

  1. John Guild
  2. Mrs. Walter Macfarlane
  3. Mrs. John Baird
  4. Mrs. A.G.M. Robertson
  5. Alexander Hume Ford

 

 

Committee for Development of the Memorial

  1. Lester Marks (chairman)
  2. J.K. Butler
  3. L.S. Cain
  4. A.L.C. Atkinson
  5. A.T. Longley
  6. H.P. O’Sullivan
  7. Norman Watkins
  8. Senator L.M. Judd
  9. J.R. Galt
  10. L.B. Reevers
  11. Alexander May
  12. R.L. Richards
  13. G.H. Angus
  14. Chamber of Commerce: Sherwood Lowrey
  15. Rotary: R.N. Burnham
  16. Ad Club: Milo Vanek
  17. Hawaiian Academy of Art and Design: Gordon Usborne
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Mrs. Ygloria

Mrs. Ygloria, wife of a pastor at Ewa,  served as volunteer interpreter at the Y.W.C.A. hostess house set up across from Fort Armstrong, where Hawaii’s National Guard was being mobilized in 1918.

Mrs. W. F. Frear, president of the Y. W. C. A., explained how the inspiration for the hostess houses came from a visit to Fort Armstrong, “Scores of Filipino women, distracted and disconsolate over the departure of their men, crouched with their babies and paper bags of provisions in the tall weeds, peering through the cracks in the fence, awaiting the leisure of their new-made soldiers.”

The hostess houses and volunteers like Mrs. Ygloria gave comfort and support to the families dealing with the departures of their sons and husbands.

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Miss Etta B. Agee

Miss Etta B. Agee was a volunteer hostess at the Y.W.C.A. hostess house set up across from Fort Armstrong, where Hawaii’s National Guard was being mobilized in 1918.

Mrs. W. F. Frear, president of the Y. W. C. A., explained how the inspiration for the hostess houses came from a visit to Fort Armstrong, “Scores of Filipino women, distracted and disconsolate over the departure of their men, crouched with their babies and paper bags of provisions in the tall weeds, peering through the cracks in the fence, awaiting the leisure of their new-made soldiers.”

The hostess houses and volunteers like Etta Agee gave comfort and support to the families dealing with the departures of their sons and husbands.

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Miss Alice Hastings

DEPARTMENT OF CIVILIAN RELIEF cared for families in Hawaii made destitute by losses in the war.

Miss Alice Hastings became territorial secretary in October, 1919, and upon the resignation of Judge Whitney, she was made director of civilian relief.  (Page 161, Kuykendall)

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Gideon Potter

By Jill Byus Radke
Gideon Potter was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 18, 1897 to Alexander and Margaret Potter. Alexander Potter moved his family to Hawaii around 1901. Initially, Alexander worked as a gardener on a pineapple plantation in the ewa district. By 1920, he was a gardener at Moanalua Gardens working for SM Damon.
Gideon and his brother, Albert, attended Honolulu School for Boys where Gideon portrayed “Nadir, a Solider” in the 1913 school production of “The Amulet.”  Gideon was also one of four boys at Honolulu School for Boys to be “prefects” with special privileges, according to the Honolulu Star-Bulletin.
Gideon enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary forces on November 21, 1916. At that time, he listed his occupation as an “accountant.”
 He was part of the 72nd  Battalion, B.C. Regiment, as a private when he was killed in an attack south of Passchendaele on October 30, 1917.
Here’s a little excerpt about the battle and the day he was killed (from “Canada at War”):

October 30, 1917: The exhausted soldiers of both Divisions are replaced with fresh battalions and the battle continues. The 3rd Division, now hanging on in shell holes, is given the formidable task of capturing the remaining length of Bellevue Spur. The battalions spread into three groups for a full frontal attack, but heavy German opposition and artillery fire crush their efforts. Individual feats of bravery again save the day, and they manage to capture two major German defences at Source and Vapour Farms. Again the 3rd Division is short of its objective, but it secures additional ground and is now on drier land. Heavy losses are suffered in this attack, particularly by Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) and the 49th Battalion.

The 4th Division also launches a three-pronged attack from the stronghold it had established partway up Passchendaele Ridge. They have great difficulty determining where they are to attack: All landmarks shown on reference maps had been obliterated; roads, trees and most buildings were reduced to dust. Nonetheless, the attack goes according to plan. Although suffering heavy casualties, they capture a series of fortified buildings – Vienna Cottages and Crest Farm – both near Passchendaele.

Another statement about that regiment from its history:
The battle of Passchendaele saw the Regiment advance, before dawn, up a gully waist deep in mud in the pouring rain to capture its objective – which British generals had assessed as requiring a full Division of 15,000 soldiers.

When the veterans returned to Vancouver they brought with them sixteen battle honours. This recognition of courage did nothing to dispel the fact that, of the 3,791 officers and men who served as Seaforths during the war, 2,515 of them became casualties.
Read more about them..

Gideon Potter is buried at Passchendeck Ridge. His burial record says, “Actual grave unknown. A memorial is erected in his honor.”
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